Tag Archive: Intel


       

Sharing has become part of the virtue when technology comes into the topic. Media sharing that works seamlessly between PC and mobile devices is the dream that software and apps developers have been working very hard to achieve. Not only because the King of post PC devices (iPad) doesn’t have a USB port, but also because nobody likes to be cluttered by annoying cables. How about the idea of showing off your vacation photos in your iPad to your friends by mirroring it on your laptop or WiDi enabled HDTV? Some of you might call me an outdated moron (Hey dude, we have an amazing stuff called AirPlay!!!), yes, I’m definitely aware of that stuff, but to be honest, how many of you have an Apple TV?

This is a totally cost free method, as long as you have a intel powered PC with Windows 7 (if your PC is running on AMD processor, you are out of luck), a mobile device running on either iOS & Android, and a stable home WiFi connection. Besides PC, those who own TV sets with built-in WiDi (Wireless Display) can also try this method.

Alright, here comes the method. First, download the Intel Pair & Share Software for PC from Intel Download Center, then install it on your Windows 7 PC. Next, search the Intel Pair & Share app from App Store or Android Market (depends on your mobile device). Download and install the app on your device (as for me, I installed it on my iPad2). When you are done, launch both the PC version and the app version on both your devices. You can now put your full concentration on the screen of your mobile Pair & Share app. On the screen, check if the app manage to detect your PC, if it does, your PC name should be listed on the app display. To connect your mobile device to your PC, just tap on your PC’s name on the screen and it will start connecting and eventually prompting you to key in a set of code, which is now displayed on your PC desktop version of Intel Pair & Share. Just key in the code and both devices will be connected instantly. Now, all you need to do is just browse through your device’s photo collection (Intel will automatically locate your photo albums for you) and tap on the photos that you want to display on your laptop widescreen or HDTV. You can select multiple photos and as you tap on each of the photo, it will simultaneously appear on your widescreen. Don’t worry, only a single photo that you tap on it will be displayed to the public, so you are totally under control.
This app works on all iOS devices (iPad, iPod Touch, and iPhone) and Android devices. Only photo can be shared through this method. The screenshots below are captured from my iPad and PC.Once you are done with the show, you can either choose to disconnect both devices from the app, or just simply close both the desktop software and the mobile app to cut off the connection.

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CES 2012: 5 Trends To Watch

The Consumer Electronics Show kicks off in Las Vegas next Tuesday, and gadget makers are getting ready to show off their latest tech products for the coming year.

Every year, a few big product trends emerge. In 2011, it was all aboutAndroid tablets; in 2010, 3D televisions and e-readers dominated the show; and in 2009, netbooks were a big topic. So what does 2012 promise? Here’s a look at five CES trends that people are already talking about.

OLED

Organic Light Emitting Diode displays promise more vivid colors, faster response times, and smaller device footprints compared to LCD/LED TVs, but the technology has yet to break into the television market. That may be about to change at CES 2012, as LG announced Monday it plans to show what it calls the world’s largest OLED HDTV.

LG’s new TV has a 55-inch display, 0.16-inch depth, weighs 16.5 pounds, and promises a response time that is less than 0.0001 milliseconds (the average LCD has a response time between 5 and 2 milliseconds). OLEDs were also a hot topic for CES 2009.

Ultrabooks

Intel introduced the concept of Ultrabooks — laptops with slim designs, solid state drives, and longer battery life — in May. Since then we’ve seen a number of Ultrabooks come out, including the Lenovo IdeaPad U300s, Acer Aspire S3, and Toshiba Portege Z835.

But the real onslaught of these MacBook Air competitors is expected at CES, with as many as 30 to 50 Ultrabooks making their debut in Las Vegas. Intel’s President and CEO Paul Otellini is delivering a keynote address at CES next Tuesday when he may discuss the forthcoming Ivy Bridge Core processors, the miniaturized successor to 2011’s Sandy Bridge chips that are at the heart of current Ultrabooks.

Quad-Core Phones

Get ready for blazing fast smartphones loaded with quad-core processors, such as Nvidia’s Tegra 3 and Qualcomm’s Snapdragon S4.

The first round of quad-core smartphones are expected within the first three months of 2012, and many tech watchers expect to see these devices at CES.

 

4K

No we’re not talking about kilobytes, but a type of display resolution that has four times the pixel density of 1080p HDTVs, the current gold standard for mass market high-definition displays.

LG plans to show off an 84-inch 4K 3D HDTV with Internet connectivity during CES. Toshiba is also working on a 4K 3D display, so perhaps we may see more than one 4K set next Tuesday in Las Vegas.

Ice Cream Sandwich

Tablets have been a big topic at CES since 2010, when device makers scrambled to get out in front of the looming release of Apple’s iPad. CES 2012 is expected to have more of the same, thanks to the release of Google’s latest Android flavor, Ice Cream Sandwich.

Unlike 2011, where the Motorola Xoom was the only device running Google’s tablet-specific version of Android (Honeycomb),ICS is already available to any manufacturer who wants it.

Electronics maker Coby plans to debut four ICS tablets at CES, and it’s a good bet other tablet makers will follow suit.

By Ian Paul

Intel’s 3D transistors are no small feat. Some are calling it a breakthrough that will allow Intel to continue to make chips that adhere to Moore’s Law (i.e. the number of transistors that can be placed on a circuit will double every two years).

           

Even that impressive feat is just business as usual. After all, Moore’s Law has been in effect for decades. The bigger news would be if Moore’s Law no longer applied to Intel chips.

So what’s the big deal with Intel’s 3D transistors? The answer lies in more than just smartphones, tablets, and set-top boxes. This fundamental new way of making the circuits of microchips could have a dramatic impact on everything from the smallest handheld devices to the biggest datacentres.

The Future of Computing

There’s no denying that the future of computing lies in small, low-power solutions coupled with big-iron cloud services. Smartphones are becoming personal computers, powerful enough to run simple desktop computing environments. Tablets are cannibalizing laptops. Entire home entertainment experiences are being jammed into tiny set-top boxes and embedded into televisions. Even Microsoft’s next version of Windows will run on low-power ARM-based chips.

Intel hasn’t excelled in all of these areas. It has a presence in televisions, thanks to Google TV and the Boxee Box, but so far the company hasn’t gained much traction in smartphones and tablets. Intel’s Moorestown chips are largely ignored. Its Medfield chips aren’t due to appear in any products until later this year, and they still may not fare well against the more-established ARM processors.

With 3D transistors, Intel may finally have the ammunition it needs to do battle in the smartphone and tablet markets. Intel claims its new transistors can switch 37 percent faster than those made with its existing 32-nm process in chips that operate at low voltage, or 18% faster in chips that operate at high voltage. Transistors switching at the same speed as those in the company’s 32nm chips can operate at significantly lower voltage, cutting power consumption in half. This change in how chips are produced is expected to raise production costs by a modest 2 or 3%, which is well worth the dramatic improvement in performance.

What It Means for You

The first products to hit the market using this new manufacturing technique will be Intel’s “Ivy Bridge” line, the successor line to the current “Sandy Bridge” line. This means the new technology will first appear in laptops, desktops, and servers that use Intel’s chips. The faster switching speeds, lower voltage operation, and lower leakage should make Ivy Bridge processors considerably more energy-efficient than the Sandy Bridge CPUs in systems today. These products are expected to hit the market in early 2012.

It will take more time for the 22nm process, and its associated 3D transistor technology, to show up in Intel’s low-power Atom CPU line-up and system-on-chips designed for smartphones and tablets. In April, Intel said it would release its first true ARM competitor in 2013. This manufacturing technology is what will make that product possible.

Intel will use this 3D transistor structure on all chips produced on its 22nm manufacturing process, regardless of the type of chip or to which market it is targeted. The upsides should be considerable and the downsides minimal. Other chip fabrication companies have been working on 3D gate structures, but aren’t expected to bring them to market for some time. Most of Intel’s competitors aren’t expected to ship 22nm high-performance products until at least late 2012, and won’t use a 3D gate structure similar to Intel’s until the next major manufacturing process step, a couple of years later.

a said by Jared Newmen

I didn’t know that!

You may have heard different company names and their brand names but do you know how they came up with those names? Why Google is Google? Why Apple Computers name their company “Apple”? Or say why the best networking company is called CISCO? Well there are reasons behind names of these companies.. so lets check it out..

Adobe – came from name of the river Adobe Creek that ran behind thehouse of founder John Warnock.

Apache – It got its name because its founders got started by applying patchesto code written for NCSA’s httpd daemon. The result was ‘A PAtCHy’server — thus, the name Apache

Apple Computers – favorite fruit of founder Steve Jobs. He was three months late in filing a name for the business, and he threatened to call his company Apple Computers if the other colleagues didn’t suggest a better name by 5 o’clock.

CISCO – its not an acronym but the short for San Francisco.

Google -the name started as a jokey boast about the amount of informationthe search-engine would be able to search. It was originally named ‘Googol’,a word for the number represented by 1 followed by 100 zeros. After founders,Stanford grad students Sergey Brin and Larry Page presented their project toan angel investor, they received a cheque made out to ‘Google’

Hotmail – Founder Jack Smith got the idea of accessing e-mail via the webfrom a computer anywhere in the world. When Sabeer Bhatia came up withthe business plan for the mail service, he tried all kinds of names ending in’mail’ and finally settled for hotmail as it included the letters “html” – theprogramming language used to write web pages. It was initially referred toas HoTMaiL with selective upper casing.

HP – Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard tossed a coin to decide whether thecompany they founded would be called Hewlett-Packard or Packard-Hewlett.

Intel – Bob Noyce and Gordon Moore wanted to name their new company’Moore Noyce’ but that was already trademarked by a hotel chain, so theyhad to settle for an acronym of INTegrated ELectronics.

Lotus (Notes) – Mitch Kapor got the name for his company from ‘The LotusPosition’ or ‘Padmasana’. Kapor used to be a teacher of TranscendentalMeditation (by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi).

Microsoft – coined by Bill Gates to represent the company that was devoted toMICROcomputer SOFTware. Originally christened Micro-Soft, the ‘-‘ was removed later on.

Motorola – Founder Paul Galvin came up with this name when his company started manufacturing radios for cars. The popular radio company at the timewas called Victrola.

ORACLE – Larry Ellison and Bob Oats were working on a consulting project for the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency). The code name for the project was called Oracle (acronym for: One Real As**ole Called Larry Ellison)

Red Hat – Company founder Marc Ewing was given the Cornell lacrosse teamcap (with red and white stripes) while at college by his grandfather. He lost it andhad to search for it desperately. The manual of the beta version of Red Hat Linuxhad an appeal to readers to return his Red Hat if found by anyone !

Samsung – meaning three stars in Korean.

SAP – “Systems, Applications, Products in Data Processing”, formed by 4 ex-IBMemployees who used to work in the ‘Systems/Applications/Projects”

SUN – founded by 4 Stanford University buddies, SUN is the acronym for StanfordUniversity Network.

Wipro – from Western India Vegetable Products Limited. The company started as a modest Vanaspati and laundry soap producer and is now also an IT services giant.
 

 

Xerox – The inventor, Chestor Carlson, named his product trying to say ‘dry’ (asit was dry copying, markedly different from the then prevailing wet copying).The Greek root ‘xer’ means dry.

Yahoo! – the word was invented by Jonathan Swift and used in his book ‘Gulliver’sTravels’. It represents a person who is repulsive in appearance and action and isbarely human. Yahoo! founders Jerry Yang and David Filo selected the namebecause they considered themselves yahoos.

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_company_name_etymologies

Arm hopes to bring high-performance graphics applications such as 3D imaging and gaming to handheld devices like smartphones while keeping battery life intact with a new graphics processor design it announced on Wednesday.

Everyday multimedia applications like video playback and image recognition draw a lot of battery life, but the company’s new Mali T604 graphics processor will accelerate those applications while drawing less power, said Ian Smythe, director of marketing at ARM. The Mali T604 will be able to handle 3D imaging and full high-definition video.

Arm also makes CPUs that go into most of world’s smartphones, and the new graphics processor will work in conjunction with CPUs to improve performance. The graphics processor delivers a five-time performance improvement over its predecessors, and when built inside a chip, consumes less than 850 milliwatts.

Smartphones have evolved over years, and today are handling a larger load of multimedia applications, Smythe said. Tasks such as gesture and speech recognition can also be off-loaded from CPUs to graphics processors. Smythe said.

Arm licenses its processor designs to chip manufacturers such as Samsung, Qualcomm, Texas Instruments and other companies. The company didn’t announce licensees for the graphics processor, but the chip designs could be found in devices like smartphones and set-top boxes two years from now, Smythe said.

The graphics processor is designed to work with the company’s latest Cortex-A15 CPU, which was announced in September. The A15, which is designed for devices ranging from smartphones to servers, could scale up in performance with up to 16 cores, with each CPU running at 2.5GHz. Both processors have coherent hardware caches and interfaces to provide a performance advantage and reduction in power consumption, Smythe said.

The concept of harnessing the power of graphics processors to boost system performance originates from PCs. Many servers, laptops and PCs now use graphics cards alongside CPUs to boost tasks like gaming, viewing video and image manipulation. Applications like Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, Mozilla’s Firefox and Google’s Chrome are implementing the capability to offload tasks like rendering of HTML 5 or Flash video content to graphics processors.

Some of the world’s fastest supercomputers also use graphics processors to speed math and science applications. But CPUs are still important, and remain at the center of processing everyday tasks such as Web browsing and running productivity applications.

Developers also need to write applications to harness the parallel-processing capabilities of CPUs and graphics processors. The Mali T604 will be compatible with Microsoft’s DirectX 11 and OpenCL 1.1, which are competing programming frameworks for parallel task execution.

DirectX 11 is a set of APIs (application programming interfaces) that are capable of bringing more realistic images to Microsoft’s Windows 7 OS, which is used on PCs. But Windows 7 works on Intel processors and does not work with Arm processors, while Microsoft’s smartphone OS — Windows Phone 7 — does not include full DirectX 11 compatibility. Arm’s Smythe declined to comment whether Microsoft’s smartphone OS would eventually build in full DirectX 11 capabilities.

The company is providing support for the DirectX 11 framework in case Arm licensees need it, Smythe said.

“We really can’t comment on Microsoft’s roadmap,” Smythe said. “We see it as a requirement from our semiconductor customers to have the capability to support DX.”

Microsoft did not immediately respond to request for comment.

The OpenCL standard includes a C-like programming language with APIs to enable parallel task execution. IBM, Apple, Intel, Nvidia and Advanced Micro Devices are among the backers of OpenCL.

as said by Agam Shah

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