Tag Archive: Microsoft


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If Microsoft were arguing that Google was using its search results to improve its own, this might make some sense. Microsoft has historically maintained the value of its closed software development and has rigorously managed to lock the world into proprietary, expensive solutions that it is loath to see copied legitimately or not by open source efforts, whether OpenOffice or Linux or Firefox. This is the Microsoft we know and love to hate, less so now that it is falling apart and must be pitied as an underdog.

But no, this is Google claiming to be wronged by the reuse of the information it makes publicly available. The company that says it does no evil and loves freedom of ideas and sharing free and open source software.

This is the company that made its fortune on a business model stolen from Overture, that it later paid off in an out of court settlement with Yahoo. This is the company that appropriated Sun’s Java platform and changed just enough to avoid paying Sun to use its technology in the development of Android. The same firm that then turned Android into an iPhone workalike in order to turn its partnership with Apple into a predatory research session.

This is the company that indexes blogs, newspapers, and both digital and physical books, and then makes all this information available without consent in the contexts of its ads and paid search space, and is dismissive of anyone who objects to Google’s ultra liberal sense of copyright. It generated controversy by driving trucks around the world to take photos of everything, connecting to WiFi base stations as it went to suck up random data it could use.

Google copies every original idea it can find, like a massive information sponge, sucking up business models and innovative creations and forming its own duplicates, often with little success. In the last year, its most obvious advances were copies of Twitter… and the revised layout of Bing.

Install the Google Toolbar and do a search of Bing, and Google actually directs your clickstream back for its own analysis. And really, that appears to be all Bing is doing, as it offers a similar option to record users’ behaviors and upload it back to Bing to improve its results.

Google is the world’s largest information thief, steamrolling partners, content creators and competitors alike under its concept of the wheels of progress, justifying its dealings as being a free remix and expression of ideas. That’s all fine and good if you don’t complain about other people also taking the information you publicly offer without a license and then remixing it themselves.

Shame on Amit Singhai

Google’s complaints about Bing are so grossly hypocritical that the company needs to issue a public apology for being self-righteously hypocritical to the point of inducing nausea. The entire affair is comically juvenile, not far removed from the sophomores who demand that commercial music and movies should be freely torrented, but then turn around in an apoplectic fit when somebody copies the HTML structure of their publicly published web site that they chose to make freely available on the Internet.

Singhai actually blogged, after going into extreme detail of exactly how Bing is using Google’s results to better its own, “Put another way, some Bing results increasingly look like an incomplete, stale version of Google results—a cheap imitation.”

He sounds like he’s describing, I don’t know, maybe Android? You know, the incomplete, stale version of iOS—a cheap imitation? That’s some ballsy hypocrisy.

“At Google we strongly believe in innovation and are proud of our search quality,” Singhai wrote. “We’ve invested thousands of person-years into developing our search algorithms because we want our users to get the right answer every time they search, and that’s not easy. We look forward to competing with genuinely new search algorithms out there—algorithms built on core innovation, and not on recycled search results from a competitor. So to all the users out there looking for the most authentic, relevant search results, we encourage you to come directly to Google. And to those who have asked what we want out of all this, the answer is simple: we’d like for this practice to stop.”

Oh hello Google, I see you’ve met the concept of investing work into something and then witnessing somebody else appropriating your ideas. Sucks doesn’t it? You know what’s worse? Doing that over and over for a decade and then making a stink to high heaven when you see anyone else do it back.

Shame on your pretentious, obnoxious, indefensibly egregious double standard in the field of using public information to turn a profit.

as said by Daniel Eran Dilger

I didn’t know that!

You may have heard different company names and their brand names but do you know how they came up with those names? Why Google is Google? Why Apple Computers name their company “Apple”? Or say why the best networking company is called CISCO? Well there are reasons behind names of these companies.. so lets check it out..

Adobe – came from name of the river Adobe Creek that ran behind thehouse of founder John Warnock.

Apache – It got its name because its founders got started by applying patchesto code written for NCSA’s httpd daemon. The result was ‘A PAtCHy’server — thus, the name Apache

Apple Computers – favorite fruit of founder Steve Jobs. He was three months late in filing a name for the business, and he threatened to call his company Apple Computers if the other colleagues didn’t suggest a better name by 5 o’clock.

CISCO – its not an acronym but the short for San Francisco.

Google -the name started as a jokey boast about the amount of informationthe search-engine would be able to search. It was originally named ‘Googol’,a word for the number represented by 1 followed by 100 zeros. After founders,Stanford grad students Sergey Brin and Larry Page presented their project toan angel investor, they received a cheque made out to ‘Google’

Hotmail – Founder Jack Smith got the idea of accessing e-mail via the webfrom a computer anywhere in the world. When Sabeer Bhatia came up withthe business plan for the mail service, he tried all kinds of names ending in’mail’ and finally settled for hotmail as it included the letters “html” – theprogramming language used to write web pages. It was initially referred toas HoTMaiL with selective upper casing.

HP – Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard tossed a coin to decide whether thecompany they founded would be called Hewlett-Packard or Packard-Hewlett.

Intel – Bob Noyce and Gordon Moore wanted to name their new company’Moore Noyce’ but that was already trademarked by a hotel chain, so theyhad to settle for an acronym of INTegrated ELectronics.

Lotus (Notes) – Mitch Kapor got the name for his company from ‘The LotusPosition’ or ‘Padmasana’. Kapor used to be a teacher of TranscendentalMeditation (by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi).

Microsoft – coined by Bill Gates to represent the company that was devoted toMICROcomputer SOFTware. Originally christened Micro-Soft, the ‘-‘ was removed later on.

Motorola – Founder Paul Galvin came up with this name when his company started manufacturing radios for cars. The popular radio company at the timewas called Victrola.

ORACLE – Larry Ellison and Bob Oats were working on a consulting project for the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency). The code name for the project was called Oracle (acronym for: One Real As**ole Called Larry Ellison)

Red Hat – Company founder Marc Ewing was given the Cornell lacrosse teamcap (with red and white stripes) while at college by his grandfather. He lost it andhad to search for it desperately. The manual of the beta version of Red Hat Linuxhad an appeal to readers to return his Red Hat if found by anyone !

Samsung – meaning three stars in Korean.

SAP – “Systems, Applications, Products in Data Processing”, formed by 4 ex-IBMemployees who used to work in the ‘Systems/Applications/Projects”

SUN – founded by 4 Stanford University buddies, SUN is the acronym for StanfordUniversity Network.

Wipro – from Western India Vegetable Products Limited. The company started as a modest Vanaspati and laundry soap producer and is now also an IT services giant.
 

 

Xerox – The inventor, Chestor Carlson, named his product trying to say ‘dry’ (asit was dry copying, markedly different from the then prevailing wet copying).The Greek root ‘xer’ means dry.

Yahoo! – the word was invented by Jonathan Swift and used in his book ‘Gulliver’sTravels’. It represents a person who is repulsive in appearance and action and isbarely human. Yahoo! founders Jerry Yang and David Filo selected the namebecause they considered themselves yahoos.

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_company_name_etymologies

Microsoft will reportedly announce a new Windows-based $200 set-top box using Windows Media Center as its primary interface, according to the Seattle Times. The company, which has been trying to put a Windows box in living rooms for more than 10 years with little success, is expected to make the announcement during the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

 Despite Microsoft’s limited past success in getting people to hook up a PC to their TV, 2011 might be the perfect time for a new Windows Media Center box. Devices from Apple, Roku and Google have garnered a lot of attention, and movie and television episode streaming from services such as Netflix and Hulu is becoming increasingly popular.

 It’s not clear what features the device will have, but considering that Windows Media Center comes with almost every new PC we can make some pretty good guesses. Media Center currently sports DVR capabilities, a TV and Web programming guide, Internet video streaming, and the ability to play or view videos, images and music stored on your home network. You can also buy a Media Center remote control so you never have to get off the couch.

 Since the new device is rumored to cost about $200–$100 more than Apple TV — and should have DVR capabilities, it would likely have a fair amount of storage (say 500GB to 1TB) for storing all those DVR-recorded shows. But that’s just a guess.

 Google TV VIA Vizio at CES

 

 Microsoft won’t be the only one showing off TV software at CES. Vizio is expected to debut a new version of its Vizio Internet Apps Plus platform with Google TV baked in. The new platform will be featured on new 47- and 55-inch HDTV sets at CES, as well as a new Vizio smartphone and tablet.

 Despite Vizio’s bet on Google TV, the new Internet TV platform has hit a few snags such as the major networks blocking website access to Google TV. Google has also asked its partners to delay releasing new Google TV-powered devices so the search giant can tweak the software, according to The New York Times . Vizio, it seems, is willing to forge ahead without Google while others have reportedly scrapped their Google TV plans for CES.

 The Joy of Internet-Connected TV

 Internet-connected TV sales were on the rise in 2010. Connected TVs now make up 12 percent of all flat panel sales, according to market research firm NPD Group. And connected TV sales between January and November 2010 rose by 38 percent compared with the same time in 2009. An NPD survey also found that 57 percent of people with Internet-connected TVs are very satisfied with their connectivity features. It sounds like people are finally willing to access the Web from their sofas, just in time for a Microsoft and Google showdown at CES.

as said by Ian Paul

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